“Atlas Shrugged”

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By: Trevor Loudon
New Zeal

Last time I was in Chicago, I got on a train in “The Loop,” to see a young girl, sitting opposite me reading a copy of Ayn Rand’s “Atlas Shrugged.” Sales of this classic book, first published in 1957, are going ballistic.

I first read this book in 1976, my first year out of High School. Brought up, as I was, on New Zealand welfare state socialism, free milk and a sense of eternal entitlement, it was like being hit around the head with a cricket bat.

While I think Ayn Rand’s militant atheism misses the mark, her grasp of political philosophy, sociology, human nature and the principles of liberty are first rate.

As the negative effects of 100 years of “progressivism,” (sent into overdrive under Obama), impact on America, “Atlas Shrugged” looks more like prophecy every day.

Anybody who believes in liberty, whether you’re an atheist, agnostic, Christian, Jew, Muslim, Hindu or Sun Worshiper should take the time to read this book.

A documentary on the novel is coming out soon.

3 thoughts on ““Atlas Shrugged”

  1. Pingback: Who is John Galt? « The Radio Patriot

  2. Hahaha.

    I love the line, “While I think Ayn Rand’s militant atheism misses the mark, her grasp of political philosophy, sociology, human nature and the principles of liberty are first rate.” How could her abnegation of samaritan ideals make her anything but atheist? All organized religions teach the communal (no, not socialist) value of cooperation and at least limited support of those members of society less able to care for themselves.

    Secondly, the idea of liberty is one which is intrinsically intertwined with democratic ideologies. Therefore, the majority of the world’s population does not experience such liberties as described in the book.

    Like you, though, when I read this book as an impressionable young man, I found it eye-opening that one could live their life solely to satisfy themselves. My parents had raised me as a protestant and taught me about service to society for the betterment of all. It was only later that I realized/learned that what this book espoused was little more than hedonism, a ‘philosophy’ that our society has dismissed for its frivolity and ignobility.

    Yes, this book has a place in our lives, but we should not credit the writings of a self-centered ideologue with being able to right the wrongs we have perpetrated on our society.

  3. “It was only later that I realized/learned that what this book espoused was little more than hedonism, a ‘philosophy’ that our society has dismissed for its frivolity and ignobility. ”

    Then you missed the mark. The point of Rand’s work was not to extol pleasure-chasers or dollar-chasers. It was to extol value-chasers, people who valued achievemnt and production. There are several passages in Atlas where her characters point out that money doesn’t really matter all that much, it’s the value at the root of money (production) that matters, and that those who pursue the hedonistic lifestyle do not actually have desires, they are simply using the pursuits of hedonism (cars, jewels, whatever) as a subsitute for and escape from the responsibility of having a real desire (to produce a new metal, or write a great symphony, or run a great railroad).

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