05/22/19

An Assumption of Dignity

By: Tabitha Korol

Rashida Tlaib, the Muslim congresswoman who proclaimed that she feels more Palestinian than American in Congress, and wrapped herself in a Palestinian terrorist flag at her victory party on Friday, May 10, proudly declared, “There’s always kind of a calming feeling, I tell folks, when I think of the Holocaust.”  We were deeply offended but not surprised as she had already revealed her lack of empathy for the tragic suffering of so many millions of innocents because she was raised in a culture of disrespect, contempt, bloodshed, and death. The Hebrew Commandments mandate respect and reciprocity (The Golden Rule), and the Hebrew and Christian Bibles were able to humanize the savages that had existed previously, while the Koran commands that Muslims torment and kill Jews, Christians, and others unless they convert to Islam (2:120; 3:56; 3:85; 3:118; 3:178; 5:14; and more).   

Tlaib added, “When I think of the Holocaust, and the tragedy of the Holocaust, and the fact that it was my ancestors — Palestinians — who lost their land and some lost their lives, their livelihood, their ‘human dignity,’ their existence in many ways, have been wiped out, and some people’s passports.”  Clarification is required here. The “tragedy of the Holocaust,” in her view, is that there were sufficient Jews who survived the Holocaust to re-establish their ancient homeland, Israel!  As for the Arabs who “lost their land and livelihood,” they left their homes based on a hollow promise that they would return when the five Arab armies defeated and eliminated the Jews.  Life presents choices, and the Arabs who chose to leave (fewer than 750,000) not only forfeited their homes but were also treated as outcasts by their own brethren, never being absorbed into the huge Islamic land mass.  They were also held as bargaining pawns, neglected by their own so that the United Nations took on the responsibility of their subsistence.  The Arabs who stayed in Israel are the grandparents of today’s Arab Israeli citizens.  Unlike their Arab counterparts, the Jews (~850,000) who fled persecution in Arab lands were welcomed and absorbed, primarily into Israel, but also into Europe and the US.

So, the “outcast” Jews and the “outcast” Arabs had the same time, land and climatic conditions to create a home where they were, but the difference is “inherent dignity.”  Out of malarial swampland and desert, the Jews worked tirelessly to build a successful, thriving country, today among the most advanced in the world, whereas the Arabs, now-named “Palestinians,” continue to this day to wallow in victimhood and world pity, teaching their children to do the same, and extending their hands for additional “humanitarian” aid. Dignity is inherent, or it is not.    

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