Marxist ‘Critical Race Theory’ Infiltrates Churches, the Culture

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By: Trevor Loudon | The Epoch Times

Parishioners sit inside the renovated Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Ga., on Jan. 19, 2002. (Erik S. Lesser/Getty Images)

When the Southern Baptists, the largest Protestant denomination in the country, endorse “critical race theory” (CRT), you know American Christianity has a Marxism problem.

At the Southern Baptist national convention in Birmingham, Alabama, in June, a resolution on CRT and “intersectionality” gained passage with a strong majority.

The resolution affirmed the Bible as “the first, last, and sufficient authority” in guiding the church on dealing with social evils and said that “critical race theory and intersectionality should only be used in submission to Scripture,” according to a news article from the Baptist Press. The resolution described critical race theory as a “set of tools to explain how race functions in society and intersectionality as the study of how various characteristics overlap.”

Traditional Baptists who believe that the Bible is the inerrant word of God and contains the answers to all problems within its pages must have wondered why their church would need Marxism for any reason at all.

One brave Christian, Tom Ascol, a senior pastor of Grace Baptist Church in Cape Coral, Florida, unsuccessfully challenged the CRT resolution, correctly explaining that “critical race theory and intersectionality” are “rooted in ideologies that are incompatible with Christianity.”

What Is Critical Race Theory?

So what actually is CRT? What does intersectionality mean?

According to the UCLA School of Public Affairs:

“CRT recognizes that racism is engrained in the fabric and system of the American society. The individual racist need not exist to note that institutional racism is pervasive in the dominant culture. This is the analytical lens that CRT uses in examining existing power structures. CRT identifies that these power structures are based on white privilege and white supremacy, which perpetuates the marginalization of people of color.”

In other words, racism is about power, it’s exclusively a white problem, and it’s intrinsic in the current social system. Therefore, to end racism, we must change the existing power structures—a polite way of saying revolution. Affirmative action, reparations, and hate speech legislation are all justified by CRT. All are revolutionary tools derived from Marxism.

Intersectionality is the concept that all oppressions are linked. Racial oppression is linked to gay oppression, which, in turn, is linked to the oppression of women and workers. This is a modern expansion of the Marxist idea that “capitalism” oppresses not only workers but racial and gender groups as well. All “oppressions” intersect. We can’t treat them as separate problems. The main problem is not just capitalism, but white racist sexist capitalism.

Two black scholars are most closely identified with modern CRT—the late Harvard Law professor Derrick Bell and the recently deceased James Cone, a professor of Systematic Theology at Union Theological Seminary.

It’s worth noting that a member of the Southern Baptist convention resolutions committee, Walter Strickland, avidly teaches Cone’s theories from his post at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in North Carolina, according to a graduate of the seminary. Strickland seems to have no conflict teaching Cone’s version of race-based Marxism to the future Baptist pastors who stream through his classroom.

James Cone: Religious Revolutionary

There is zero doubt that James Cone was a Marxist.

In 1980, the Democratic Socialists of America published an essay by Cone titled “The Black Church and Marxism: What Do They Have to Say to Each Other?”

In June 1984, a delegation of Black American Church leaders visited Havana.

Granma, the Cuban Communist Party newspaper, reported that the organizers included the communist-controlled Ecumenical Council of Cuba, the Baptist Worker-Student Coordination of Cuba, and the Caribbean Council of Churches. The Black Theology Project was listed as a U.S. sponsor, and the Soviet-controlled Christian Peace Conference was also represented.

Delegates included Rev. Jeremiah Wright of UCC Trinity Church in Chicago, the future pastor to Barack Obama; William Babley, director of the Racial Union Program of the Methodist Church; Howard Dodson, chairman of the Black Theology Project; Dwight Hopkins, vice chairman of the Black Theology Project and a future founder of the communist-led Black Radical Congress; and James Cone of Union Theological Seminary.

Cone was also a little un-Christian in his racial views.

In his 1969 book, “Black Theology and Black Power,” Cone wrote: “The time has come for white America to be silent and listen to black people. … All white men are responsible for white oppression. … Theologically, Malcolm X was not far wrong when he called the white man ‘the devil.’”

In a 2004 essay, Cone opined: “Black suffering is getting worse, not better. … White supremacy is so clever and evasive that we can hardly name it. It claims not to exist, even though black people are dying daily from its poison.”

Derrick Bell: Legal Revolutionary

Derrick Bell, who a young Barack Obama once praised at a Harvard protest rally as comparable to Rosa Parks, was also a man of considerable influence.

According to his 2011 New York Times obituary, Bell’s “1973 book, ‘Race, Racism and American Law,’ became a staple in law schools and is now in its sixth edition.”

Bell “set the agenda in many ways for scholarship on race in the academy, not just the legal academy,” Lani Guinier, told The New York Times. Guinier was the first black woman hired to join Harvard Law School’s tenured faculty and is the daughter of the late leading Communist Party USA member Ewart Guinier.

Bell was a contributor to the journal Freedomways, which has been described as “one of the most influential African-American literary and political journals of the 1960s and 1970s.” Freedomways was established and run by well-documented members and sympathizers of the Communist Party USA.

According to Accuracy in Media, documents declassified in 2011/2012 from Operation SOLO, an FBI program to infiltrate the Communist Party, revealed that Freedomways, which closed in 1986, was subsidized by both the Soviet and Chinese communist parties.

Bell was also a founding member of the National Conference of Black Lawyers, the self-proclaimed “legal arm of the Black Liberation Movement.”

According to an archived page of the organization’s website:

“In 1968, young people of African descent in America were growing impatient with the slow pace of social change. Despite modest advances brought on by two decades of non-violent resistance, from one end of the country to the other, the cry for Black Power was raised in the midst of a sea of clinched fists. At the same time, this new militant spirit had moved many to don black berets and carry rifles. On street corners in practically every Black community, passers-by heard demands for Nation Time and Power to the People!

“Inevitably, the powers-that-be responded to this activist renaissance with police brutality, frame-ups and a vicious counter-intelligence program that targeted scores of militants for harassment, prosecution or assassination. A small group of Black lawyers refused to sit idly by while the iron fist of government came down hard on the bravest and most intelligent of the Black community’s younger generation. This period forced the birth of the National Conference of Black Lawyers which, as an organization, began to stand shoulder-to-shoulder with rifle-toting revolutionaries.”

The National Conference of Black Lawyers was a U.S. affiliate of the International Association of Democratic Lawyers, a still-existing international communist front originally founded by the Soviet Union.

Is CRT Compatible With Christianity?

Is CRT compatible with Christianity, or indeed any God-centered faith?

Christianity is based entirely around the individual and his or her relationship with God. It is the individual who may be saved through faith in Jesus Christ, not the collective.

How can a collectivist philosophy that emphasizes racial division above all else and despises all manifestations of individual liberty have anything to offer Christianity? The answer is simple: It doesn’t. CRT is a Marxist technique used to divide society into antagonistic racial groups that can be manipulated to create chaos and revolution.

Are those who bring CRT into the church Christian? Or are they Marxists posing as Christians? Is their true purpose salvation or revolution?

I was told recently of an episode that occurred in a church in North Carolina. The young pastor, all fired up with CRT, noticed that a black family and a white family in his congregation shared the same surname. He falsely concluded that the ancestors of the white family must have once owned the ancestors of the black family. From the pulpit, the pastor demanded that the white family apologize to the black family for the slave-owning sins of their forefathers. The white family bravely refused to apologize for the nonexistent transgression, which created a major split in the church. That church no longer exists.

CRT is not just a Southern Baptist problem. This false Marxist doctrine is taught in churches, seminaries, and universities all across the United States.

Some brave souls are standing against this corrupt doctrine, but hundreds of thousands of seminarians and churchgoers are going along with revolution posing as religion.

The late great Andrew Breitbart used to say that “politics is downstream from culture.” He could have added that “culture is downstream from religion.”

The Southern Baptists, the most conservative major Protestant denomination in the United States, have started down the Marxist road. Several other denominations are well ahead of them. If this isn’t reversed, how will this shift affect our culture and politics in years to come?

Trevor Loudon is an author, filmmaker, and public speaker from New Zealand. For more than 30 years, he has researched radical left, Marxist, and terrorist movements and their covert influence on mainstream politics.

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