10/26/20

The Murder Plot Against the President

By: Cliff Kincaid

Some scoff at the concept of a “Deep State” as a “conspiracy theory.” But nobody knows the truth better than Senator Chuck Schumer, the Senate Democratic leader, who once questioned why Trump would fight the intelligence agencies, since “they have six ways from Sunday at getting back at you.” The phrase “six ways from Sunday” means in every possible way. Another common formulation is “by any means necessary.”

The U.S. Secret Service intercepted a Ricin-laced letter with the words, “If it doesn’t work, I will find a better recipe,” addressed to President Trump. Pascale Ferrier, a Canadian previously deported from the U.S., was apprehended and charged on September 24 with threatening to kill the president by using the poison. She was arrested with a loaded gun and a knife and had previously tweeted a hashtag supportive of killing Trump.

The Ferrier case seems like the work of a bumbling amateur, although Ricin (and Novichok) are poisons known to be used by the remnants of the Soviet KGB. Assassination plots involving the CIA are usually more sophisticated.

For those inclined to dismiss the idea of hit squads or assassins targeting American figures, consider the mysterious 2010 death of former presidential aide John P. Wheeler, the subject of a new “Unsolved Mysteries” story on Netflix. His body was found at the Cherry Island Landfill in Joe Biden’s state of Delaware. Wheeler, who associated with members of the political and military elite, was said by his wife to have looked “frightened” before his death.  Described as the “Washington Insider Murder,” he was also said to have many “enemies” from his work in the national defense area.

Another Washington insider, Trump Attorney General William Barr, also seems frightened. He disclosed that the probe into Obamagate won’t produce a report until after the election. Obamagate involves how the Obama-Biden Administration used the intelligence agencies to destroy and obstruct the Trump presidency, using material supplied by Russia and paid for by Hillary Clinton.

Investigator Chris Farrell asks why Barr fights Judicial Watch in virtually every Freedom of Information Act lawsuit seeking records over the Obamagate coup plot. Farrell, who was banned by Fox for criticizing George Soros on the Lou Dobbs show, has also drawn attention to CIA director Gina Haspel’s role in Obamagate.

The FBI is headed by Christopher Wray, who was nominated by Trump but sat on the evidence of corruption in Hunter Biden’s laptop for almost a year. (The FBI has since reportedly interviewed Hunter business associate Tony Bobulinski).

On top of this cover-up, Big Tech has censored evidence of Democratic Presidential candidate Joe Biden’s involvement in his son’s schemes involving China and Ukraine.

The Department of Justice has filed suit against Google, the gatekeeper of the Internet, over-exercising monopoly control over how the American people get their news, but the action comes too late to make a real difference on November 3.

Barr’s failures tell us a lot about the power of the Deep State.

Barr, who previously worked for the CIA, had organized support for the FBI sniper who killed Randy Weaver’s wife in the 1992 Ruby Ridge operation. She was killed as she was holding her baby daughter in her arms.

Ruby Ridge is the scandal involving the FBI and ATF assaulting a right-wing figure, a so-called “white supremacist,” living in Idaho who had been set up on a charge of selling an illegal weapon, a sawed-off shotgun.

Wanting to demonstrate their power, federal agencies staged an armed attack on Weaver’s family. Weaver’s 14-year-old son was shot to death by federal Marshalls carrying machine guns. Weaver was found not guilty of assaulting federal officers.

Ruby Ridge was followed by the federal siege of the Waco religious compound on April 19, 1993, when more than eighty men, women, and children were shot or burned to death. Federal agencies attacked the compound of a religious cult, the Branch Davidians, on the pretext that children were being abused. They could have apprehended the leader of the religious compound without killing all those people. It was another demonstration of their power.

The Obama and Epstein Cover-Ups

As author Jack Cashill has demonstrated in his book, Unmasking Obama, federal agencies were used in other ways under the presidency of Barack Hussein Obama, such as the IRS attacks on conservative and Tea Party groups. Most importantly, the FBI covered-up the evidence of Obama’s debt to communist Frank Marshall Davis and his patron, the old Soviet Union.

Years later, the Jeffrey Epstein scandal remains unresolved, even as the media mock some conservatives for believing in the existence of a high-level pedophile ring. Cindy McCain, who says “We all knew what he [Epstein] was doing,” has endorsed Biden for president. Her husband, who lost a winnable election against Obama in 2008, peddled the phony Hillary-financed Russian dossier to the FBI.

Mitt Romney, the Utah Republican Senator who voted to impeach Trump, ran as the Republican presidential candidate in 2012 and lost to Obama. Trump blames Romney’s running mate, Paul Ryan, for moving Fox News to the left, as Ryan joined the board of Fox Corporation in 2019.

My own coverage of Ruby Ridge and Waco, which occurred during the Clinton Administration, was among the major incidents convincing me that important agencies of the federal government were compromised and hopelessly corrupt. Another eye-opening episode was the crash of TWA Flight 800, which resulted in the deaths of 230 passengers and crew on July 17, 1996. Federal “investigators” blamed a fuel tank explosion when eyewitnesses saw missiles hit the plane. The CIA actually produced a video showing the huge nose-less jet ascending like a rocket, an aeronautical impossibility.

In 1993 I covered the strange death of Clinton White House deputy counsel Vincent Foster, a murder labeled a “suicide” in an Independent Counsel investigation led by a Republican named Kenneth Starr and his assistant, prosecutor Brett Kavanaugh. Evidence demonstrated the existence of a shadowy group of operatives who would intimidate a witness, Patrick Knowlton, with information contradicting the government’s story. Foster had access to the secrets of Hillary Clinton and the National Security Agency (NSA).

David Martin’s new book, The Murder of Vince Foster: America’s Would-Be Dreyfus Affair, examines the case, including alleged Foster connections to drug smuggling, the CIA, and organized crime.

Starr later became a Fox News contributor, a supposed expert on the impeachment campaign against Trump, while Kavanaugh was nominated by Trump to the Supreme Court. It was another indication that the Swamp occupies both sides of the “partisan divide” and affects both major political parties. Starr, by the way, was a legal counsel for Jeffrey Epstein.

In the Bush Administration, we would learn that federal operatives from the FBI, and perhaps other agencies, would be deployed to frame patriotic American scientists for the post-9/11 anthrax attacks carried out with anthrax stolen from a U.S. lab. One scientist, Steven Hatfill, would collect millions of dollars from the Department of Justice in damages over his harassment, while another, Bruce Ivins, would end up dead after being persecuted by federal agents under the direction of then-FBI Director and future Russia-gate special counsel Robert Mueller.

Former Louisiana State Senator John Milkovich, a Democrat, wrote a book on Robert Mueller, subtitled “Errand boy for the New World Order,” looking at his role in matters such as 9/11, organized crime figure Whitey Bulger, and the crooked bank BCCI.

Mueller keeps emerging at sensitive times in American history when the federal government wants to perpetuate a certain storyline about a delicate national security matter.

What’s absolutely clear is that Trump, a true outsider to Washington, has enemies here and abroad.

Concern about Trump’s physical health and safety accelerated after he was infected by the China virus at the first presidential debate, leading author J.C. Hawkins to speculate that he was infected “by a rogue Secret Service agent or staff member secretly working for The Deep State.”

Various reports had indicated that seven people who attended judge Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination announcement, held outside at the White House, tested positive for the coronavirus. But former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, who also came down with the virus and was hospitalized, said that he had last tested negative ahead of the first presidential debate and was not having any symptoms then.

The Cleveland Clinic, the debate co-host, subsequently acknowledged that 11 people involved in debate preparation tested positive. We still don’t know who they are.

Weeks after this, Democratic Governor Gretchen Whitmer of Michigan displayed the anti-Trump “86/45” sign during a TV appearance. The number “86” can be shorthand for killing someone. Whitmer had been on Joe Biden’s shortlist for vice-presidential candidates.

One does not have to be a “conspiracy theorist” to see a disturbing pattern.

*Cliff Kincaid is president of America’s Survival, Inc. www.usasurvival.org

10/26/20

BLM and Communist China

Via: Vimeo


10/26/20

No Strategic Break Between the Taliban and al Qaeda

By: Denise Simon | Founders Code

Beginning with the trade during the Obama administration of Bowe Bergdahl for 5 Taliban commanders from Gitmo, the United States is still in peace negotiations with the Taliban and a peace framework has been signed and violated several times of no consequence.

However, there is news to report with confirmation.

The United States has confirmed that Husam Abd-al-Ra’uf, a senior al Qaeda leader also known as Abu Muhsin al-Masri, was killed by Afghan forces during a raid in Ghazni province earlier this month.

Chris Miller, the head of the National Counterterrorism Center, described Abd-al-Ra’uf’s “removal…from the battlefield” as “a major setback to a terrorist organization that is consistently experiencing strategic losses facilitated by the United States and its partners,” according to Reuters. Miller touted the raid further, saying it “highlights the diminishing effectiveness of the terrorist organization.”

However, Miller implied just last month that characters such as Abd-al-Ra’uf were either unimportant or didn’t even exist. In an op-ed published by the Washington Post on Sept. 10, Miller claimed that Ayman al Zawahiri was al Qaeda’s “sole remaining ideological leader.” As FDD’s Long War Journal pointed out, that isn’t true. Zawahiri’s role was never purely ideological, and he isn’t the sole remaining al Qaeda leader, ideological or otherwise. A number of al Qaeda veterans remain active in the network’s hierarchy, including, until recently, Abd-al-Ra’uf.

Abd-al-Ra’uf’s demise is undoubtedly significant. He was a veteran jihadist, whose career began in the 1980s. He was a trusted subordinate for Zawahiri and served al Qaeda in senior roles, including in its propaganda arm, As Sahab. But it is debatable whether his death, as well as other setbacks, add up to “strategic losses” for al Qaeda in Afghanistan or elsewhere, as Miller claims. It is likely that Abd-al-Ra’uf trained and oversaw many other al Qaeda men throughout his lengthy career. And the U.S. has been unable to produce consistent, reliable estimates of al Qaeda’s strength inside Afghanistan.

Al Qaeda fights for the Taliban in Ghazni and elsewhere

There has been no strategic break between the Taliban and al Qaeda. Abd-al-Ra’uf was reportedly killed in the village of Kunsaf, which is controlled by the Taliban. If the Taliban’s men did not betray the Egyptians, and there is no evidence that they did, then yet again a senior al Qaeda leader was found in Taliban country. This is an apparent violation of the Feb. 29 withdrawal agreement between the U.S. State Department and the Taliban. The State Department has repeatedly vouched for the Taliban’s supposed counterterrorism assurances, including that al Qaeda wouldn’t be allowed to operate on Afghan soil. But nearly eight months after that deal was signed, Abd-al-Ra’uf was located in a Taliban-controlled area.

Al Qaeda has a long-established presence in Ghazni. FDD’s Long War Journal can trace al Qaeda operations in Ghazni back to 2008.

Aafia Siddiqui, dubbed “Lady al Qaeda” in the press, was among the al Qaeda figures captured or killed during raids in Ghazni in 2008. There have been multiple operations targeting al Qaeda in Ghazni since then.

Al Qaeda’s role in the fighting in Ghazni is referenced in the files recovered in Osama bin Laden’s compound. In a June 19, 2010 memo to bin Laden, Atiyah Abd al Rahman wrote that al Qaeda had “very strong military activity in Afghanistan.” Rahman, who served as bin Laden’s key lieutenant, listed Ghazni was one of eight provinces in which al Qaeda “groups” had been “the same for every season for many years now.” Rahman was killed in a drone strike the following year.

In subsequent letters that were also written in 2010, bin Laden ordered his operatives in northern Pakistan to relocate into Afghanistan. Ghazni was one of several provinces that the al Qaeda founder considered hospitable for his men. Operational evidence confirms that al Qaeda was still operating in Ghazni years later.

In Feb. 2017, Afghan troops killed Qari Saifullah Akhtar, a senior al Qaeda leader who also doubled as the emir for Harakat-ul-Jihad-al-Islami (HUJI), a Pakistan-based terror group. Later that year, in Dec. 2017, the U.S. killed Omar Khetab (a.k.a. Omar Mansour), the “second senior leader” in AQIS, al Qaeda’s regional branch. In Mar. of 2019, the Afghan military claimed it killed 31 AQIS fighters in the district of Giro. In Sept. 2019, Afghan forces raided a warehouse that Al Qaeda in the Indian Subcontinent (AQIS) used to house explosives for operations jointly conducted with the Taliban.

Should al Qaeda help the Taliban recapture much of Afghanistan after America’s planned withdrawal from Afghanistan in the spring of 2021, and there is no real break between the two, then that could be considered a strategic victory for the group.

Thomas Joscelyn is a Senior Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies and the Senior Editor for FDD’s Long War Journal.

10/26/20

China to Sanction U.S. Defense Contractors Over Taiwan

By: Denise Simon | Founders Code

The One China Policy supported by previous administrations has been earnestly challenged by the Trump administration and rightly so. China has forcefully held dominion over Taiwan, an independent nation, and since the Trump administration has approved arms sales to Taiwan, the tensions have increased substantially.

Context:

Jamestown: Events throughout 2020 have seen a measured but steady increase in tensions surrounding Taiwan. The government of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) continues to deny any legitimacy to the democratically-elected government of the Republic of China (ROC) in Taiwan. The PRC also continues to make menacing insistence upon unification on Beijing’s terms, in language that has grown more strident throughout the tenure of Chinese Communist Party (CCP) General Secretary Xi Jinping (China Brief, February 15, 2019; China Brief, November 1, 2019).

Against this background, the PRC has reacted with both harsh rhetoric and saber-rattling to enhanced U.S.-Taiwan diplomatic contacts in August and September, as well as a reported further round of impending U.S.-Taiwan arms sales (see discussion further below). One PRC English-language outlet opined in late September that “The U.S. has been releasing all kinds of supportive signals to Taiwan this year, with the level and frequency of their so-called interactions flagrantly enhanced… While [some in Taiwan] jump at such signals, they’d better think long and hard whether the signals are sweet poisons from the U.S. for Taiwan” (PLA Daily, September 25).

U.S. Diplomatic Visits to Taiwan

Recent years have seen a noteworthy increase in official and semi-official U.S.-Taiwan diplomatic exchanges. In March 2018 the Taiwan Travel Act (TTA) was signed into U.S. law, providing a statement of support for increased travel by high-level Taiwan officials to the United States. This was followed by unofficial “transit stop” visits in the United States by ROC President Tsai Ying-Wen (蔡英文) in 2018 and 2019, and a May 2019 meeting between U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton and his ROC counterpart David Lee (李大維) (China Brief, July 31, 2019). In early February this year, ROC Vice President-elect Lai Ching-te (賴清德) traveled to the United States, where he met with senior U.S. political figures and attended the annual National Prayer Breakfast in Washington D.C. (Taiwan News, February 4). Although Lai had not yet assumed office at the time and therefore visited in an unofficial role, the trip produced harsh condemnations in the PRC state press (Xinhua, February 6). All of these visits by Taiwan officials have drawn similarly negative reactions from the PRC Foreign Ministry and state media, as with the “stern representations” presented over President Tsai’s stop in Hawaii in March 2019 (Xinhua, March 21, 2019).

These visits were reciprocated in summer and autumn this year by two visits made by U.S. officials to Taiwan. U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar conducted a visit to Taiwan from August 9-12, described by his department as “the highest-level visit by a U.S. Cabinet official since 1979,” and “part of America’s policy of sending high-level U.S. officials to Taiwan to reaffirm the U.S.-Taiwan friendship” (HHS, August 4). Secretary Azar’s activities included a meeting with President Tsai; a visit to Taiwan’s Central Epidemic Command Center; and a speech at National Taiwan University (HHS, August 10; August 11; August 12). This trip was followed in mid-September by a visit from the U.S. Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment Keith Krach, who traveled to Taiwan to attend a memorial service for former ROC President Lee Teng-hui (U.S. State Department, September 16).

Pentagon Approves $500 Million Taiwan F-16 Support Program ...

Bloomberg:

China will impose unspecified sanctions on the defense unit of Boeing Co., Lockheed Martin Corp., and Raytheon Technologies Corp. after the U.S. approved $1.8 billion in arms sales to Taiwan last week.

The sanctions will be imposed “in order to uphold national interests,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian told reporters Monday in Beijing. “Boeing Defense” would be among those sanctioned, he said.

The State Department last week approved $1.8 billion in new weapons for Taiwan and submitted the package to Congress for a final review. The submission comes two months after the U.S. and Taiwan completed the sale of 66 new model F-16 Block 70 aircraft from Lockheed, and as tensions between the two superpowers continue to escalate ahead of the American election.

Boeing Defense is one of the broader company’s three business units, according to its website. Shares in Boeing, down almost 50% this year, dropped as much as 2.2% in U.S. pre-market trading.

A spokesperson for Boeing emphasized the firm’s relationship with China in the aviation space. Boeing has “worked together successfully with the aviation community in China for almost 50 years to support Chinese efforts to ensure a safe, efficient and profitable aviation system to keep pace with the country’s rapid economic growth.”

“It’s been a partnership with long-term benefits and one that Boeing remains committed to,” the spokesperson said in the emailed statement.

One China Principle

Representatives from Raytheon weren’t immediately available for comment outside of normal U.S. business hours.

Zhao condemned Lockheed’s F-16 Block 70 sale at the time, saying it violates the One China principle, interferes in China’s internal affairs and will have a “major impact” on U.S.-China relations. Taiwan’s presidential office thanked the U.S for the sale. In July, China — which considers Taiwan part of its territory and resists any recognition of its de facto independence — had announced sanctions on Lockheed Martin for a previous arms sale to the island.

U.S. arms manufacturers face strict limitations on what kind of business they can do with countries deemed by Washington to be strategic rivals, such as China. Lockheed generated 9.7% of its revenue in the Asia-Pacific region last year, according to data compiled by Bloomberg, though that’s not broken down by individual countries.

China has previously threatened to sanction U.S. companies, including General Dynamics Corp. and Honeywell International Inc., on numerous occasions over arms sales to Taiwan. It also warned it could blacklist FedEx Corp., while Ford Motor Co.’s main joint venture partner in China was fined 162.8 million yuan ($24.3 million) last year, days after the U.S. put a ban on doing business with Huawei Technologies Co.

While China has often invoked the threat of putting U.S. companies on a blacklist — or list of “unreliable entities” — in response to various actions by U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration over the past year, it has yet to name any, at least publicly.

Delicate Time

For Boeing, China’s action comes at a delicate time. The company, reeling from the hit to air travel from the coronavirus pandemic, is trying to get its besieged 737 Max plane back into the air after two fatal crashes saw it grounded around the world. China was the first place to ground the plane, and also has the world’s biggest 737 Max fleet.

Europe’s top aviation regulator said earlier this month the plane will be safe enough to fly again before the end of this year, while U.S. Federal Aviation Administration chief Steve Dickson flew the Max in September and said the controls were “very comfortable.” More detail here.