08/20/19

Historical Look at Afghanistan, US in or Out?

By: Denise Simon | Founders Code

As we hear the talks with the Taliban have concluded with the United States, we have no idea just yet whether the United States will keep troops in the country in an unknown quantity. Could it be that the Taliban have truly defeated coalition nations in Afghanistan… that victory for the Taliban is real?

What could happen next if the Taliban shares the rule of the nation? More Taliban, more al Qaeda, more ISIS? Or could there be another Russian invasion? How about other major conflicts in the future that include the Tajiks, the Uzbeks or maybe the Hazaras? Or China?

In particular, the analysis cites a local media report claiming that local militias of former Tajik Mujahedeen have started to remobilizing alongside the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces in Afghanistan’s Panjshir province because of an uptick in threats against the province from the Taliban. The media report, published by TOLO News, claims the area has “changed to a hub for insurgents’ activities over the past few weeks.”

Afghanistan - Comintern (SH) - for a communist Afhjanistan ...

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08/15/19

Annie Oakley: The Forgotten History of the Most Iconic American Woman Sharpshooter

By: Ammo.com

Annie Oakley: The Forgotten History of the Most Iconic American Woman SharpshooterPhoebe Ann Moses (or perhaps Mosey) was born on August 13, 1860, to humble beginnings. The daughter of Quakers, America’s first female superstar grew up log-cabin poor in the rural western Ohio county of Darke. From this rough start to entertaining world leaders, Phoebe Ann Moses, better known as Annie Oakley, was not only an icon of the American West, she was, and still is, a hero to women and girls from coast to coast.

Annie’s story begins as the youngest of eight siblings. Already poor, the family became desolate when Annie’s father died when she was six. Her mother remarried quickly, but was widowed a year later and soon after bore another child. Left with too many mouths to feed and little choice, Annie’s mother turned Annie, then nine, and one of her sisters into the care of the superintendent of the Darke County Infirmary, a home for the elderly, orphaned, and mentally ill.

In exchange for her room and board, Annie helped care for the family’s children and the Infirmary’s patients. While there, she learned to sew and decorate clothing, a skill that she used for the rest of her life.

Annie was then transferred to a neighboring home, to a family with a new child, and was told she would receive an education and $.50 a week for her services. Instead, she was treated like a slave, abused, and neglected. Eventually, Annie ran away from the family that she only referred to as “the Wolves” and made her way back to her mother’s farm.

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08/11/19

ONE PICTURE OF AMERICANA: What has Changed?

By: Doug Ross @ Journal

Here is a picture of a rifle class typical of those conducted in schools just a few decades ago.

Kids took their rifles to class on the school bus.

What’s changed?

Could it be the growing epidemic of kids in single-parent households (“Of the 27 Deadliest Mass Shooters, 26 of Them Were Fatherless“)?

Could it be the mainstreaming of America hatred and demonization of law enforcement?

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07/19/19

How About The Katyn Trials For Starters?

By: Denise Simon | Founders Code

Since revisionist history is commonplace, few either know about the Nuremberg trials or remember the details. A book published years ago and finally translated in English titled: ‘Judgment in Moscow’ written by Vladimir Bukovsky asks the very question of why no Nuremberg type trials for the Soviets or Russians. In full disclosure, only recently I interviewed Mr. Bukovsky who has been living in England.

After the fall of the Soviet Union, Mr. Bukovsky returned to Russia and traced documents proving the horrific crimes of the Soviets. In a prisoner swap, Mr. Bukovsky was later released from a Soviet prison. He knows full well the human rights atrocities of the Soviet Union and modern-day Russia. Included are concentration camps, torture, and genocide but outright murder cannot go unpunished. Someone, please tell the New York Times to quit being so sympathetic with Moscow… anyway… how about the Katyn Massacre for starters?

This massacre happened in 1939 during the Soviet invasion of Poland when the Soviets massacred 8,000 Polish military officers and an estimated 6,000 police officers and hundreds of regular citizens. There are at least 8 mass graves in the Katyn forest holding the remains of Polish nationals killed by the NKVD, otherwise known as the Peoples Commissariat for Internal Affairs. A great case for real reparations for sure.
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07/18/19

Giving Credit Where Credit is Due

By: T F Stern | Self-Educated American

We were watching a movie the other day on one of the regular channels where you get to see a few minutes of the movie followed by several minutes of commercials.  The efforts of the moviemakers got lost somewhere between combining car, house and life insurance, more comfortable jockey shorts and deciding which brand of whiskey best matched the outdoor sportsman in us.

At a certain point, you consider yourself ‘invested’ in watching the movie until its conclusion while attempting to ignore interruptions.  Maybe this is how cable companies have figured how to get folks to pay for adding movie channels; just interrupt the programming on the regular channels enough and people will pay not to see commercials.

The movie was ending as the credits began to roll across the screen, a chance to give individuals who’d put the movie together credit.  Did I say roll across the screen; I meant sprint past at nearly the speed of light.  Evelyn Woods Speed Reading Course had not prepared me for this particular exercise.  To make it more challenging, they split the screen so that the credits for the previously viewed movie, now in a tiny box in the corner of the screen, could play out while introducing the next feature.

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07/18/19

Bowling Alone: How Washington Has Helped Destroy American Civil Society and Family Life

Ammo.com

Church attendance in the United States is at an all-time low, according to a Gallup poll released in April 2019. This decline has not been a steady one. Indeed, over the last 20 years, church attendance has fallen by 20 percent. This might not sound like cause for concern off the bat. And if you’re not a person of faith, you might rightly wonder why you would care about such a thing.

Church attendance is simply a measure of something deeper: social cohesion. It’s worth noting that the religions with the highest rate of attendance according to Pew Forum have almost notoriously high levels of social cohesion: Latter-Day Saints, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Evangelical Protestants, Mormons and historically black churches top the list.

There’s also the question of religious donations. Religious giving has declined by 50 percent since 1990, according to a 2016 article in the New York Times. This means people who previously used religious services to make ends meet now either have to go without or receive funding from the government. This, in turn, strengthens the central power of the state.

It is our position that civil society – those elements of society which exist independently of big government and big business – are essential to a functioning and free society. What’s more, these institutions are in rapid decline in the United States and have been for over 50 years.

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07/10/19

10 Year Anniversary: Help Keep Keywiki Free and Fighting for You!!!

By: Trevor Loudon | New Zeal

Help keep Keywiki FREE and Fighting for you!!!

This week Keywiki, the world’s largest public database of subversive politicians, activists, communists, agitators and out and out traitors, celebrates its 10th anniversary. A decade ago, editor Trevor Loudon created the first Keywiki page, an entry on an obscure Chicago socialist named Lou Pardo.

Since then Keywiki has grown to become an Internet phenomenon. At more than 120,000 files, Keywiki has become the go-to source for activists, patriots, journalists, and historians trying to uncover the massive Marxist penetration of American politics and culture.

If you want to know the Marxist background of previous US presidents, you can visit the Barack Obama or Bill Clinton files.

If you want to know the radical bona fides of those we need to stop from becoming president, visit the Kamala HarrisBernie Sanders, or Joe Biden pages.

Let’s help Keywiki become even more effective over the next decade and beyond. We have several ideas to make Keywiki even more valuable to the cause of liberty but we need your help. We want to raise $15,000 over the next month, to put Keywiki on a more secure financial footing. We want to re-design the Keywiki Mainpage for a more professional look. We want to add features to make Keywiki more “user-friendly.” We want to organize a group of researchers to help post tens of thousands of pages of unprocessed information.

How you can help…

If just a small proportion of regular Keywiki users donated just $10 today, we would easily meet our target in a few hours. Larger donations, of course, are enthusiastically encouraged!

Please go HERE right now to make a one-time or recurring donation to Keywiki.

If 200 Keywiki users committed to a regular payment of just $5 a month, Keywiki’s financial future would be assured and we would be able to expand both our content and the range of services offered.

If you’d like to grant Keywiki even more substantial support or if you want to become a Keywiki researcher, please contact editor Trevor Loudon at [email protected]

07/4/19

Lenin’s Hero Nechayev: The Evilest Communist Who Ever Lived?

By: Trevor Loudon | The Epoch Times

Russian communist revolutionary leader, Vladimir Lenin (1879 – 1924), giving a speech to men of the Red Army leaving for the front, during the Polish-Soviet War, Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square), Moscow, 5th May 1920. On the right of the platform are People’s Commissar Leon Trotsky (1879 – 1940) and Politburo member Lev Kamenev (1883 – 1936). (Keystone/Getty Images)

Whether consciously aware of it or not, every communist dictator, butcher, torturer, and terrorist of the past century and a half owes a debt to Sergey Gennadiyevich Nechayev.

Nechayev is known for pioneering the concept of the “professional revolutionary.” Vladimir Lenin’s elder brother, Aleksandr Ulyanov, who was executed after a failed assassination attempt on Czar Alexander III, was part of an organization inspired by Nechayev.

In the 20th century, several revolutionary groups, including the Black Panther Party and Germany’s Red Brigades, all drew inspiration from Nechayev, who was often referred to as the “Bolshevik before the Bolsheviks.” Lenin himself was highly influenced by Nechayev, often referring to him as the “titan of the revolution” and further urged all communist revolutionaries to read his work.

Lenin was right. To truly understand communism, one must read Nechayev.

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07/4/19

The Betsy Ross Flag: 5 Things You Didn’t Know About This American Icon

Ammo.com

5 Things You Didn't Know About the Betsy Ross FlagSecond only to Old Glory itself, the Betsy Ross Flag is the American icon. Its clean design is similar to our current flag, with 13 stripes and only 13 stars in a circle (representing the equal status of what were then the 13 united individual sovereign nations). This simplicity is perhaps the reason for its popularity among American Patriots and Constitutionalists, as it hearkens back to an earlier time when America was still a place of freedom and resistance to tyranny.

But while this flag is the oldest attested flag for the American nation, many people don’t know its history. Who was Betsy Ross? And how did this iconic design become one of the strongest symbols of freedom?

1. Betsy Ross was shunned by Quakers and her family.

A Quaker like many in Pennsylvania, Betsy Ross was born Elizabeth Griscom. Once her education in public school ended, her father had her apprenticed to an upholsterer. It was at this job that she met her future husband, John Ross – an Episcopal and brother of George Ross, who signed the Declaration of Independence. Since the Quaker community frowned upon inter-denominational marriage, the two eloped when Betsy was 21 years old.

After the elopement, Betsy was estranged from her family and expelled from her Quaker congregation. Her husband died a few years later during the Revolution. (Some have speculated that Betsy was the “beautiful young widow” who caught Carl von Donop’s eye after the Battle of Iron Works Hill.) It was after John Ross’ death that Betsy rejoined the Quakers – this time the Free Quakers, fighters who supported the war effort.

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07/4/19

Independence Day: The Forgotten History of America’s 4th of July and What It Commemorates

Ammo.com

Every American knows what Independence Day is. Alongside Christmas and Thanksgiving, it’s one of the few holidays that hasn’t fallen prey to having to be celebrated on the closest Monday, rather than the actual day it falls on. However, less known is the history of the Fourth of July as a holiday. How did the celebrations emerge and what is the history of this, America’s birthday?

Few know that the 13 Colonies actually legally separated from the mother country, the United Kingdom of Great Britain, on July 2nd, not July 4th. This was the day that the Continental Congress voted to approve a resolution of independence. After voting in favor of independence, Congress then turned toward the actual drafting of the resolution, which we know today as the Declaration of Independence. It was on July 4th that Congress approved the resolution.

For his part, John Adams believed that July 2nd would be the day to be celebrated throughout the ages in the United States. While his prediction was two days off, his prediction of how the day would be celebrated is pretty close to the mark:

“It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations, from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forever more.”

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