09/5/21

Big Labor’s Socialist Agenda

By: Cliff Kincaid

The phrase, “Workers of the world unite,” is right from the Communist Manifesto. As we celebrate Labor Day, it’s important to remember how the communists historically tried to tap into the anger and discontent of American workers. Herbert Romerstein, who worked for the House Committee on Un-American Activities, the House Internal Security Committee, and the House Intelligence Committee, documented communist manipulation of the organized labor movement in a report for my group America’s Survival, Inc.

How successful have the communists been?

In today’s America, their main vehicle is the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), a Marxist organization that draws heavily from the ideas of the late Italian Communist Party theoretician Antonio Gramsci and refers to its members as “comrades.” DSA, which describes itself as the largest socialist organization in the United States, says it has “rapidly grown from 6,000 to almost 100,000 members” and “helped elect 155 DSA-endorsed candidates,” often by “running open socialists on the Democratic Party ballot line.”

The most prominent member of the DSA is Bronx Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, best known as AOC, who is described as DSA’s “foremost socialist superstar.” In 2019, the group says they “coordinated” an “organization-wide vote on endorsing Bernie for President.”

Former President Barack Hussein Obama’s socialist backing goes back at least to 1996 when he received the endorsement of the Chicago branch of the Democratic Socialists of America for an Illinois state senate seat.  Former AFL-CIO boss John Sweeney was a member of Democratic Socialists of America

Back in 2011, I grilled a top official of the 12.5 million-member AFL-CIO, Karen Nussbaum, about her participation in an illegal 1970 trip to Communist Cuba organized by Weather Underground terrorist Bernardine Dohrn. The exchange was captured on tape.

Since Castro and his communist successors have outlawed independent labor unions in Cuba, as well as freedom in general, Nussbaum’s fascination with the communist system on the island is a relevant line of inquiry for those concerned about the dangers of socialism and totalitarianism here and the current direction of the AFL-CIO.

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08/26/21

2021 Afghanistan is not 1975 Vietnam

By: Yoram Ettinger | CCNS

  1. In 1975, the US disengagement from Vietnam fulfilled the goal of the Viet Cong, thus ending the US-Vietnam conflict.

In 2021, the US disengagement from Afghanistan advances – but does not fulfill – the goal of the Taliban and Al Qaeda, and therefore does not end the conflict between the US and Islamic terrorism.

In 1975, the vision and strategic goal of the Viet Cong was limited to the territory of Vietnam, consistent with an eventual peaceful coexistence and cooperation with the resourceful US.

In 2021, the 14-century-old vision and strategic goal of Islamic terrorism is not limited to the territory of Afghanistan. It is driven by fanatic imperialism, striving to subordinate the “infidel” West – and especially “The Great US Satan” – which is perceived to be the key obstacle on the way to Islamic global domination. Islamic terrorism is determined to establish a global Islamic society, ruled by the Quran and Sharia (“divine law”), which is inconsistent with peaceful coexistence with the “infidel” US, irrespective of its involvement in Afghanistan. In fact, it requires a decisive war against the US, including terrorism on the US mainland.

In 1975, the US was involved in a Vietnam civil war, faced with the choice of fighting in the Vietnam trenches, or disengage and spare itself a war.

In 2021, the US is fighting against an intrinsic, anti-US Islamic terrorism, faced with the choice of confronting Islamic terrorists in their own trenches (which is costly), or disengaging and gradually shifting the war to the US trenches (which is dramatically costlier).

  1. In 2021, US policy-makers are reminded that the Taliban and all rogue regimes are not impressed by – and are not willing to adopt – the Western values of human rights, democracy, international law, and peaceful coexistence.

Moreover, rogue regimes are not impressed by US diplomacy, as they are by effective US counter-terrorism and posture of deterrence.

Islamic terrorists don’t seek popularity in the international community. They seek to intimidate the international community all the way to submission, peacefully or militarily.

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08/21/21

Battle of Appomattox: Understanding General Lee’s Surrender

By: Sam Jacobs | Ammo.com

battle of appomattoxThe Battle of Appomattox Courthouse is considered by many historians the end of the Civil War and the start of post-Civil War America. The events of General Robert E. Lee’s surrender to General and future President Ulysses S. Grant at a small-town courthouse in Central Virginia put into effect much of what was to follow.

The surrender at Appomattox Courthouse was about reconciliation, healing, and restoring the Union. While the Radical Republicans had their mercifully brief time in the sun rubbing defeated Dixie’s nose in it, largely in response to the Southern “Black Codes,” they represented the bleeding edge of Northern radicalism that wanted to punish the South, not reintegrate it into the Union as an equal partner.

The sentiment of actual Civil War veterans is far removed from the attitude of the far left in America today. Modern-day “woke-Americans” clamor for the removal of Confederate statues in the South, the lion’s share of which were erected while Civil War veterans were still alive. There was little objection to these statues at the time because it was considered an important part of the national reconciliation to allow the defeated South to honor its wartime dead and because there is a longstanding tradition of memorializing defeated foes in honor cultures.

The Events of the Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

Long story short, the Battle of Appomattox Courthouse was a last-ditch effort by General Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia to meet up with the remaining Confederate forces to consolidate their efforts. The Greys failed and General Lee surrendered to Grant which effectively ended the war.

For ceremonial purposes, General Lee waited for General Grant in a white uniform. Grant, who suffered from migraines, noticed his headaches end once he and Lee had negotiated a ceasefire. Grant, in his magnanimity, allowed Lee to choose the place of his surrender – Lee famously chose the Appomattox Courthouse.

General Grant’s generosity extended beyond allowing Lee to choose the location of his surrender. Lee’s men were allowed to keep their horses, sidearms, and personal effects, including their mules ­–Grant recognized the importance of the mules for the upcoming plowing season. Grant went so far as to give Lee’s men rations for their journey home. Lee could not have hoped for much more and certainly would have been satisfied with far less.

The terms of surrender were dictated to Grant’s assistant, a Seneca Indian by the name of Ely S. Parker. Lee commented at the time that “It is good to have one real American here,” to which Parker replied, “Sir, we are all Americans.” Indeed, this was perhaps truer than it had ever been in American history.

civil war

A particularly poignant moment followed when Lee exited the courthouse and Grant’s men applauded in celebration but were quickly rebuked by their commanding officers. He immediately ordered an end to any celebration, remarking that “The Confederates were now our countrymen, and we did not want to exult over their downfall.”

General Custer and other officers purchased furnishings from the room where the surrender took place as souvenirs. General Grant went out to visit General Lee and other Confederate soldiers. The two sat on the porch of the McLean House, where the two talked before setting off for their respective capital cities. Generals Longstreet and Pickett also made an appearance.

Grant was not the only one willing to make concessions in the name of national unity – the very idea of a ceremony of surrender was anathema to much of the top brass in the Confederacy.

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07/18/21

The Downing of TWA Flight 800: 25 Years Ago Today

By: Roger Aronoff | CCNS

July 17 marks the 25th anniversary of the downing of TWA Flight 800, in which 230 people were killed when the Boeing 747 blew up off the coast of Long Island, New York just 12 minutes into a flight from New York to Paris. Last week in Ashburn, Va., not far from the nation’s capital, the reconstructed fuselage of the plane was set to be scrapped, as if to wipe that memory from the nation’s memory bank.

Earlier this month James Kallstrom died. He was the FBI’s headman in New York, and he led the FBI’s criminal investigation into the explosion that brought the plane down. I was set to meet with Kallstrom, along with my correspondent Reid Collins while working on a documentary on the subject in 2001, but less than an hour before our scheduled meeting, he called me to reschedule, which never came about.

This was a story that I was intimately involved with, having participated in the investigations into the cause of the disaster, and having written and produced a documentary laying out the case at the time for the three leading theories as to what brought the plane down: a naval exercise gone wrong; a terrorist attack on the plane; or a mechanical and electrical failure, which is the official version of what happened.

On July 2nd, 2013, I saw the reconstructed fuselage of TWA Flight 800 at a press briefing put on by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), shortly after the wreckage was brought to the NTSB Academy in Ashburn, about 45 minutes outside of D.C.

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06/29/21

John Wayne: The Forgotten History of “The Duke”

By: Sam Jacobs | Ammo.com

john wayne

John Wayne is an American Hollywood icon every bit the equal of James Dean or Marilyn Monroe. He is also a man from another era, a man whose conservatism came as naturally as walking down the street. Affectionately known as “The Duke,” he spent three decades as a top box office draw with 179 film and television credits to his name

Before The Duke: Marion Robert Morrison

His story is as American as his values. Born Marion Robert Morrison in Iowa at a whopping 13 pounds, his family relocated to Southern California. His family first arrived in America from Ireland in 1799 and his grandfather was a Civil War veteran. His nickname was bestowed upon him in childhood (“Little Duke” at the time) by a milkman amused by the omnipresence of Wayne’s Airdale Terrier, Duke.

Wayne attended the University of Southern California where he studied pre-law and played football for the Trojans before a broken collarbone from a bodysurfing accident ended his college athletic career. Losing his athletic scholarship forced Wayne to drop out of school.

He was first hired by the legendary Western director, John Ford, and silent Western star, Tom Mix. It was Mix who then introduced him to Wyatt Earp, who Wayne credited with his on-screen mannerisms.

Becoming the Duke: John Wayne’s Early Film Career

Wayne was hired as a favor to the equally legendary USC coach, Howard Jones, who later portrayed himself in Knute Rockne, All American, the famous Ronald Reagan film. Wayne soon graduated from an extra and prop boy to bigger parts – this began his life-long working relationship with director Ford. Director Raoul Walsh renamed Marion Robert Morrison “John Wayne,” though Wayne would keep his birth name for the rest of his life. Wayne was not present at the meeting where his stage name was crafted.

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06/21/21

Outside View: Specter of Tuskegee Returns

By: Rand H. Fishbein, Ph.D. | CCNS

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published in 2005 by CCNS member, Rand H. Fishbein, Ph.D.

It has been more than 70 years since the U.S. Public Health Service began its study into the effects of syphilis on 399 human test subjects — all of them black, all of them poor and most of them illiterate. When the infamous Tuskegee experiments finally came to light in 1972, the public, at last, learned the horrible truth.

The men in the Tuskegee study were never told they had syphilis, nor were they told the real purpose behind their participation in the experiment. Worse, they were systematically denied treatments that would have eased their suffering. In the annals of U.S. medical history, the Tuskegee experiments have become synonymous with ethical misconduct at its worst. The federal government assured the public that malpractice of this sort would never happen again. Sadly, however, it has.

Beginning in 1997, a team of researchers from The Johns Hopkins University, generously sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, conducted a clinical trial of the drug nevirapine in Uganda. Known as HIVNET 012, the researchers sought to prove that the anti-retroviral drug was safe and effective in preventing the transmission of the deadly AIDS virus from pregnant mothers to their newborn babies. According to the NIH, approximately 800,000 children worldwide became infected with the human immunodeficiency virus — the organism that causes AIDS — through mother-to-child transmission in 2002.

In 1999, the researchers published their findings: One dose of the drug nevirapine, given to a mother shortly before delivery, and once to her newborn, significantly reduced the incidence of HIV transmission to the child. The World Health Organization affirmed its support of this simple and inexpensive regimen. The medical community quickly adopted nevirapine as the drug of choice for pregnant HIV-infected women in resource-poor countries.

Yet, as with the Tuskegee experiments, something went horribly wrong. In 2002, an audit of the HIVNET 012 trial raised questions about the validity of the study data. According to independent auditors, medical records of study participants could not support the published results, and numerous violations of the study protocol occurred without written explanation.

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06/7/21

ATF Nominee And Waco Special Agent Chipman Lied In Pushing For Massacre

By: Daniel John Sobieski

No, that is not David Chipman standing in the ruins of the burnt-out Waco compound, site of the 1993 slaughter of members of the Branch Davidian religious group led by David Koresh. He was too busy back at the office helping to manufacture and disseminate lies about what went on at the compound to justify a brutal, murderous, and unnecessary assault.

The animus he exhibited in his tenure at ATF towards gun owners and gun rights, to the point of using violence as a gun-control tactic, reflects a view he holds today and shares with the likes of Biden “gun czar” Beto O’Rourke, and includes gun confiscation by armed agents of legally purchased guns owned by law-abiding citizens. His definition of an assault rifle is so broad as to include virtually all rifles owned by lawful gun owners.

He is no fan of the Second Amendment which was put in the Bill of Rights to protect the other nine; put there by Founding Fathers as an ultimate bulwark against tyrants and tyranny. It was written to protect individual gun ownership because the British were coming, not because deer were in season. It was written to prevent such tyranny as David Chipman envisions,

The Branch Davidians could be described as an earlier version of Obama’s despised “bitter clingers,” clinging to their guns and their interpretation of the Bible but basically just wanting to be left alone. You might call their compound an early “autonomous zone,” but not set up by the genuinely violent and dangerous Antifa and BLM protesters that looted, burned, and killed at will while law enforcement pursued the law-abiding gun owners of America. As it was, the Branch Davidians could have been dealt with non-violently. Chipman felt otherwise, making up false horror stories to justify a violent assault. As Tiana Lowe notes in the Washington Examiner:

Chipman was indeed a case agent in the Waco siege of the Branch Davidian compound. The incident was a massacre of civil liberties and the rule of law, in addition to the 82 lives, it ended unnecessarily. Rather than bring up credible sexual assault charges against cult leader David Koresh, who could easily have been arrested during his jogs around the compound and jaunts into town, the ATF staged a militarized and performative military action against American citizens.   

The Waco stunt, endorsed by the Clinton administration as a part of its crackdown against the Second Amendment, also found a quiet defender in then-Sen. Biden. Even after evidence emerged that the ATF had whipped up baseless charges about a meth lab in order to secure helicopters and charge firearms violations, Biden proved a partisan, opposing oversight hearings that were certain to damage the Clinton administration.

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05/24/21

Nicaragua’s Battle against Communism

By: Terresa Monroe-Hamilton

For several decades now, Michael Johns and J. Michael Waller have ranked among the conservative movement’s most high-profile and influential foreign policy and national security experts, helping shape high-level American positions on some of the most complex and challenging threats confronting the United States both during and following the end of the Cold War.

Until recently, however, both Johns and Waller remained largely silent about their incredibly bold and intriguing experience as college students when, together, they were among only a very few Americans to visit the frontlines of Nicaragua’s civil war, where the Soviet Union, Cuba, and Nicaragua’s communist regime were facing growing military opposition from the U.S.-backed anti-communist resistance forces, known as the contras, in one of the Reagan Doctrine’s highest-profile and most consequential Cold War conflicts.

In January 1984, Johns, then a University of Miami student, and Waller, a George Washington University student, were granted access to the contras’ primary base camp on the frontlines of this now historic Cold War conflict.

Appearing on One America News (OAN) a few weeks ago, Johns and Waller both opened up to OAN prime time host Kara McKinney about the historic 1984 visit. The segment is hugely compelling and can be seen here in its entirety: “Contras in Nicaragua with J. Michael Waller and Michael Johns,” One America News, March 25, 2021.

Michael Johns on visiting the contras:

“We were intrigued by geopolitics, very committed to the Reagan vision of a strong America in the world and also anti-communism and sympathy and support for those who were rising up globally against it. That ultimately came to formulate what was known as the Reagan Doctrine, which was a centerpiece of American foreign policy from the mid-1980s until the end of the Cold War in 1991. The operating thesis—which was widely embraced by conservatives and Republicans and widely resisted by progressives at the time–was that the U.S. should be supporting those individuals who rise up against repressive communist regimes as part of our Cold War struggle…Nicaragua was the centerpiece to that. It was probably the most contentious and high profile of all those conflicts, and we had the opportunity to be one of the few Americans who got out into the base camps of the contras. We heard their stories individually and from a leadership standpoint, and we both went on to champion support for the contras and the broader Reagan Doctrine policy,” Johns said in the OAN segment.

Michael Waller on visiting the contras:

“We were supporting President Reagan. I was working here in Washington, D.C., and Mike was down at Miami. The left was very strong back then supporting the communists in Nicaragua and doing everything possible to prevent President Reagan from resisting them. The Soviet Union was expanding its presence around the world to choke us off, to cut off our supply lines, our sea lines of communication, and in our own hemisphere it had expanded its nuclear bomber base in Cuba, which it still uses today, flying its Tu-95 bombers off our Atlantic Coast, and its intelligence station there that the Chinese have now and supporting third world insurgencies; these were communist guerrilla and terrorist movements and subversive political movements that were working with them in an extremely well-run intelligence operation that was run by the Cubans under Soviet control. To get a Soviet foothold on the mainland of the Americas would be a mortal blow to our country…so supporting the Nicaraguan contras was key…,” Waller added in this OAN segment.

In the many years since their largely untold collegiate visit to this vital Cold War conflict, both Johns and Waller have gone on to prominent and influential roles in public policy, academia, government, and the private sector.

Biography: Michael Johns

As a foreign policy analyst at The Heritage Foundation, Johns led the foundation’s Reagan Doctrine initiatives and spent time on the frontlines of most of the world’s anti-communist resistance movements aided under the Reagan Doctrine. He returned to Central America in 1988 to assist contra military commander Enrique Bermudez in authoring his autobiographical essay, “The Contras’ Valley Forge: How I View the Nicaragua Crisis.” (Bermudez was later assassinated in February 1991 in Managua).

Johns also supported and visited Jonas Savimbi’s UNITA forces in Angola (Savimbi was killed in a firefight with Angola’s communist forces in 2002) and with the coalition forces in Cambodia that were engaged in opposing both Khmer Rouge forces and the Vietnamese-back government.

Johns went on to direct global programming at the International Republican Institute (IRI) and to serve as a senior aide to a Republican governor and senator, a White House presidential speechwriter, and one of the February 2009 co-founders and strategists in the immensely influential U.S. Tea Party movement, widely credited with the Republican victories in the U.S. House in 2010, the U.S. Senate in 2014, and in paving the way for former President Trump’s populist campaign victory in 2016. He has written for The Wall Street Journal, The Christian Science Monitor, National Review, and other global and national media.

Biography: J. Michael Waller

Waller is a senior analyst at the Center for Security Policy and a former professor and instructor at the Institute of World Politics, the Naval Postgraduate School, and the John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School at Fort Bragg. He holds a Ph.D. in international security affairs from Boston University and has written for The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, The Los Angeles Times, and other global and national media.

05/22/21

How Totalitarianism Rhymes Throughout History: Czechoslovakia, China, & Venezuela

By: Sam Jacobs | Ammo.com

what is totalitarianism“It can’t happen here” is a political cliche in the United States. Regardless of your personal viewpoint, there is a vast swath of the American population who simply do not believe in the possibility of any kind of totalitarianism in the United States.

It’s worth noting that throughout history, in virtually every place that totalitarian regimes have arisen, the residents of these countries felt the same way. Russia was seen as too traditional and backward, the power of the Czar too entrenched to be defeated. Germany had been viewed throughout most of the modern period as the home of GoetheSchiller, and Mozart, a place where the local Jewish population had largely assimilated.

Because totalitarianism emerges differently throughout history in different countries, it’s crucial to take a broader view of how totalitarian regimes arise. For example, when we’re discussing the rise of communism or the rise of fascism, we see different trends in Russia than we do in China, different trends in Italy than we do in Germany. When we examine multiple, somewhat lesser-known examples of the rise of socialism throughout the world, we paint a picture of the different ways in which socialism originated and its possible resurgence.

This case study of terror analyses three examples of totalitarianism throughout history. In Czechoslovakia, the Communist Party was able to establish the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic by leveraging little more than a strong showing – but not a victory – in the parliamentary elections. During the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution of Communist China in the 1960s, Chairman Mao came out of relative isolation to radically remake an already communist country. Lastly, we will look right in America’s backyard at the rise of Hugo Chavez in Venezuela.

More than perhaps anywhere else, the rise of totalitarianism throughout the world is an excellent example of the quote often attributed to Mark Twain, “history doesn’t repeat itself, but it does rhyme.” If you are looking for a mechanical repeat of the past, you are looking in the wrong place. Our point is not to show you that the exact same things are currently happening here in the United States, but to highlight similarities.

The Czechoslovak Coup d’Etat of 1948

Czechoslovak flag

Standing on this side of history, it’s easy to take Soviet domination over Eastern Europe as a given. However, at no point during the early transition from Nazi domination to the post-war period was it a fait accompli that the formerly occupied nations of Eastern Europe wouldn’t go back to being free and independent nations. Czechoslovakia is perhaps one of the best examples we have of a country that was by no means “destined” to go communist.

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