10/14/19

Abolishing Columbus Day is Based on Lies

By: Denise Simon | Founders Code

Roughly 10 states and 100+ U.S. cities observe some version of Indigenous Peoples Day this month.

Native American advocates have been working since the early 1990s to get states to make the swap, the AP reports.

From today: Columbus statues in San Francisco and Providence, Rhode Island, were vandalized with red paint, CNN reports.

“Vandals had chained a sign to the base of the statue that said ‘Stop Celebrating Genocide’ and spray-painted the word ‘Genocide’ on the monument.”

***

You can be sure this all began within the education system where U.S. history was taught using Howard Zinn’s book entitled A People’s History of the United States. This book was full of lies and distortions that educators and faculty including higher education administrators put forth and never bothered to validate any claim he made. Now we have legislators at the state level that have bought into the same falsehoods.

In part from The Federalist:

Zinn died in 2010, but his work continues on through the Zinn Education Project that in September collaborated with the Smithsonian in offering credit-bearing “teach-in” classes on abolishing Columbus Day for teachers. On October 8 they mailed out a newsletter that lauded two states, Maine and New Mexico, and cities, such as Columbus, Ohio, and Alexandria, Virginia, that in the past year replaced Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples Day. Also just joining the list are Washington, D.C. and Princeton, New Jersey.

The newsletter urged teachers to purchase and download their materials to lead students in lobbying their schools and cities to join the effort to “Abolish Columbus Day.”

“Celebrating Columbus means celebrating colonialism, celebrating racism, celebrating genocide,” the newsletter announced. Instead, “tribute” should be paid “to the people who were here first, who are still here, and who are leading the struggle for a sustainable planet.”

The political agenda is clear. Like Zinn himself, the project presents the American Indian as one amorphous mass embodying the stereotype of communistic pacifist feminists. It’s the “Usable Indian,” which at one time embodied the “savage,” but then in the 1960s the hippie. The Indian serves as proxy in the never-ending “struggle.”

Truth be told, as an explorer, Columbus made four trips, never reaching what is known as America or any part of the mainland. In 1492, Columbus reached the Bahamian islands, arriving in San Salvador.

Whose History Matters? Students Can Name Columbus, But ...

He sailed around islands such as Hispaniola and the Dominican Republic. He soon departed leaving behind a handful of crew members. Arriving back in Spain, he had very little to offer the Queen. In 1493, he sailed again reaching Hispaniola finding the settlement destroyed and ordered it rebuilt. He did gift the Queen about 500 slaves and she was horrified ordering them to be returned. In 1498, he sailed again and reached Trinidad and the South American mainland. Here there was a bloody revolt and Spanish authorities sent a new governor to take over.

There was one more trip in 1502. This time he reached what is known as Panama. Due to major storms, there was such damage to two of his four ships, two had to be abandoned. He returned once again to Spain, for the most part again empty-handed and he died in 1506.

He kept a journal which he gifted to the Queen.

Christopher Columbus Diary Quotes. QuotesGram

In all of his travels, in the end, the result was, in fact, more open trade between Spain and Latin America in goods such as wheat, coffee, sugar, corn, tomatoes, and potatoes.

Ever wonder if the part about successful trade entered any part of the studies of Columbus?

09/11/19

The 9/11 Attacks: Understanding Al-Qaeda and the Domestic Fall-Out from America’s Secret War

Ammo.com

The 9/11 Attacks: Understanding Al-Qaeda and the Domestic Fall-Out from America's Secret WarWith American military personnel now entering service who were not even alive on 9/11, this seems an appropriate time to reexamine the events of September 11, 2001 – the opaque motives for the attacks, the equally opaque motives for the counter-offensive by the United States and its allies known as the Global War on Terror, and the domestic fall-out for Americans concerned about the erosion of their civil liberties on the homefront.

Before venturing further, it’s worth noting that our appraisal is not among the most common explanations. Osama bin Laden, his lieutenants at Al-Qaeda, and the men who carried out the attack against the World Trade Centers and the Pentagon are not “crazy,” unhinged psychopaths launching an attack against the United States without what they consider to be a good reason.

Nor do we consider then-President George W. Bush to be either a simpleton, a willing conspirator, an oil profiteer, or a Machiavellian puppet whose cabinet were all too happy to take advantage of a crisis.

The American press tends to portray its leaders as fools and knaves, and America’s enemies as psychopathic. Keeping the narrative simple – “Black and white,” “good versus evil,” “right and wrong,” etc. – is intellectually easy, even with something as complex as the 9/11 attacks.

Instead, it is our considered opinion that the events of 9/11 and those that followed in direct response to the attacks – including the invasion of Iraq – were carried out by good faith rational actors who believed they were acting in the best interests of their religion or their nation.

This does not in any way absolve the principals from moral responsibility for the consequences of their actions. It does, however, provide what we believe to be a more accurate and nuanced depiction of events than is generally forthcoming from any sector of the media – because we see these principals as excellent chess players who, in the broad sweep of events, engaged in actions which are explicable.

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09/11/19

9/11 — 18 Years Later

By: Denise Simon | Founders Code

It is a solemn day for sure. It is a day where memories begin to fade and for some, there are no memories at all. The ‘Never Again’ must be taught and understood by those that were not yet born at the time or are too young to comprehend the details.

But, America, don’t be sad. Each year that passes from that day that struck the hearts and souls of America, we have come to learn more and America DID prove how resolute and resilient we actually are as citizens. Those attributes are to be celebrated. Sure, we have given up too many freedoms to prevent another such attack. Our way of life did change forever that day, yet for the victims of 9/11 and those so near to all that occurred that day and for all the days that followed, many of their lives changed in often unspeakable ways.

A firefighter at the site of the World Trade Centre in New York on September 11 2001

This is a time to review what has passed to ensure it is not dismissed as a distant chapter in American history.

On September 11, 2001–a clear, sunny, late summer day–al Qaeda terrorists aboard three hijacked passenger planes carried out coordinated suicide attacks against the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., killing everyone on board the planes and nearly 3,000 people on the ground. A fourth plane crashed into a field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania, killing all on board, after passengers and crew attempted to wrest control from the hijackers.

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09/4/19

Read the Commerce Clause in the Light Cast by the Other Parts of Our Constitution

By Publius Huldah

The parts of our federal Constitution are so interrelated that it is impossible to understand a single clause therein without considering all of the other provisions of our Constitution.

Article I, §8, clause 3, US Constitution, states:

“The Congress shall have Power … To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes;”

The original intent of the power to regulate commerce “among the several States” is proved here:  Does the “interstate commerce” clause authorize Congress to force us to buy health insurance?  That paper proves that the primary purpose of the power is to prohibit the States from imposing tolls and tariffs on articles of import and export – goods & commodities – merchandise – as they are transported through the States for purposes of buying and selling.

But recently, some have asserted that since “foreign Nations”, “the several States”, and “the Indian Tribes” are grouped together in the same clause, it necessarily follows that Congress’ power to “regulate commerce” with each of them is identical.  And since Congress has broad powers over foreign commerce, they conclude that Congress has those same broad powers over interstate commerce, and may lawfully, for example, ban the movement of physical goods [such as firearms] across state lines.

So let’s look at that clause in the Light cast by the rest of the Constitution.

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08/21/19

Siege at Ruby Ridge: The Forgotten History of the ATF Shootout That Started a Militia Movement

Ammo.com

Siege at Ruby Ridge: The Forgotten History of the ATF Shootout That Started a Militia MovementThe Siege at Ruby Ridge is often considered a pivotal date in American history. The shootout between Randy Weaver and his family and federal agents on August 21, 1992, is one that kicked off the Constitutional Militia Movement and left America with a deep distrust of its leadership – in particular, then-President George H.W. Bush and eventual President Bill Clinton and Attorney General Janet Reno.

The short version is this: Randy Weaver and his wife Vicki moved with their four kids to the Idaho Panhandle, near the Canadian border, to escape what they thought was an increasingly corrupt world. The Weavers held racial separatist beliefs but were not involved in any violent activity or rhetoric. They were peaceful Christians who simply wanted to be left alone.

Specifically for his beliefs, Randy Weaver was targeted by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF) in an entrapping “sting” operation designed to gain his cooperation as a snitch. When he refused to become a federal informant, he was charged with illegally selling firearms. Due to a miscommunication about his court date, the Marshal Service was brought in, who laid siege to his house and shot and killed his wife and 14-year-old son.

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08/20/19

Historical Look at Afghanistan, US in or Out?

By: Denise Simon | Founders Code

As we hear the talks with the Taliban have concluded with the United States, we have no idea just yet whether the United States will keep troops in the country in an unknown quantity. Could it be that the Taliban have truly defeated coalition nations in Afghanistan… that victory for the Taliban is real?

What could happen next if the Taliban shares the rule of the nation? More Taliban, more al Qaeda, more ISIS? Or could there be another Russian invasion? How about other major conflicts in the future that include the Tajiks, the Uzbeks or maybe the Hazaras? Or China?

In particular, the analysis cites a local media report claiming that local militias of former Tajik Mujahedeen have started to remobilizing alongside the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces in Afghanistan’s Panjshir province because of an uptick in threats against the province from the Taliban. The media report, published by TOLO News, claims the area has “changed to a hub for insurgents’ activities over the past few weeks.”

Afghanistan - Comintern (SH) - for a communist Afhjanistan ...

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08/15/19

Annie Oakley: The Forgotten History of the Most Iconic American Woman Sharpshooter

By: Ammo.com

Annie Oakley: The Forgotten History of the Most Iconic American Woman SharpshooterPhoebe Ann Moses (or perhaps Mosey) was born on August 13, 1860, to humble beginnings. The daughter of Quakers, America’s first female superstar grew up log-cabin poor in the rural western Ohio county of Darke. From this rough start to entertaining world leaders, Phoebe Ann Moses, better known as Annie Oakley, was not only an icon of the American West, she was, and still is, a hero to women and girls from coast to coast.

Annie’s story begins as the youngest of eight siblings. Already poor, the family became desolate when Annie’s father died when she was six. Her mother remarried quickly, but was widowed a year later and soon after bore another child. Left with too many mouths to feed and little choice, Annie’s mother turned Annie, then nine, and one of her sisters into the care of the superintendent of the Darke County Infirmary, a home for the elderly, orphaned, and mentally ill.

In exchange for her room and board, Annie helped care for the family’s children and the Infirmary’s patients. While there, she learned to sew and decorate clothing, a skill that she used for the rest of her life.

Annie was then transferred to a neighboring home, to a family with a new child, and was told she would receive an education and $.50 a week for her services. Instead, she was treated like a slave, abused, and neglected. Eventually, Annie ran away from the family that she only referred to as “the Wolves” and made her way back to her mother’s farm.

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08/11/19

ONE PICTURE OF AMERICANA: What has Changed?

By: Doug Ross @ Journal

Here is a picture of a rifle class typical of those conducted in schools just a few decades ago.

Kids took their rifles to class on the school bus.

What’s changed?

Could it be the growing epidemic of kids in single-parent households (“Of the 27 Deadliest Mass Shooters, 26 of Them Were Fatherless“)?

Could it be the mainstreaming of America hatred and demonization of law enforcement?

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07/19/19

How About The Katyn Trials For Starters?

By: Denise Simon | Founders Code

Since revisionist history is commonplace, few either know about the Nuremberg trials or remember the details. A book published years ago and finally translated in English titled: ‘Judgment in Moscow’ written by Vladimir Bukovsky asks the very question of why no Nuremberg type trials for the Soviets or Russians. In full disclosure, only recently I interviewed Mr. Bukovsky who has been living in England.

After the fall of the Soviet Union, Mr. Bukovsky returned to Russia and traced documents proving the horrific crimes of the Soviets. In a prisoner swap, Mr. Bukovsky was later released from a Soviet prison. He knows full well the human rights atrocities of the Soviet Union and modern-day Russia. Included are concentration camps, torture, and genocide but outright murder cannot go unpunished. Someone, please tell the New York Times to quit being so sympathetic with Moscow… anyway… how about the Katyn Massacre for starters?

This massacre happened in 1939 during the Soviet invasion of Poland when the Soviets massacred 8,000 Polish military officers and an estimated 6,000 police officers and hundreds of regular citizens. There are at least 8 mass graves in the Katyn forest holding the remains of Polish nationals killed by the NKVD, otherwise known as the Peoples Commissariat for Internal Affairs. A great case for real reparations for sure.
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07/18/19

Giving Credit Where Credit is Due

By: T F Stern | Self-Educated American

We were watching a movie the other day on one of the regular channels where you get to see a few minutes of the movie followed by several minutes of commercials.  The efforts of the moviemakers got lost somewhere between combining car, house and life insurance, more comfortable jockey shorts and deciding which brand of whiskey best matched the outdoor sportsman in us.

At a certain point, you consider yourself ‘invested’ in watching the movie until its conclusion while attempting to ignore interruptions.  Maybe this is how cable companies have figured how to get folks to pay for adding movie channels; just interrupt the programming on the regular channels enough and people will pay not to see commercials.

The movie was ending as the credits began to roll across the screen, a chance to give individuals who’d put the movie together credit.  Did I say roll across the screen; I meant sprint past at nearly the speed of light.  Evelyn Woods Speed Reading Course had not prepared me for this particular exercise.  To make it more challenging, they split the screen so that the credits for the previously viewed movie, now in a tiny box in the corner of the screen, could play out while introducing the next feature.

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